Vitamin D and Healthy Aging

The Introduction

vitamin DWe have known for many years that a deficiency of vitamin D has been linked to osteoporosis and bone fractures in older people. However, recent research has also linked Vitamin D insufficiency with higher incidences of many medical conditions that affect the risk of death, including hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and infection. Research has shown that older people do not take in enough vitamin D in their diet, despite them knowing they need to. Moreover, older adults are at high risk for vitamin D insufficiency because of a lower ultraviolet (UV) B light exposure from lower levels of outdoor activity, especially in winter months and especially in colder climates. This study examined the relationships between a blood pre-cursor of vitamin D (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin – [25(OH)D)] levels) and mortality (death) in a representative U.S. sample of older adults over the age of 65 years.

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Do multivitamins really protect us against cancer or heart disease?

The Introduction

Millions of post-menopausal women use multivitamins in the belief that these supplements prevent chronic diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The marketing and advertising industry has lead us to believe they will help prevent chronic disease. But what are the facts? A recent American study examined relationships between multivitamin use and risk of cancer, CVD, and mortality in 161,808 post-menopausal women.

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Noticed a lot of publicity lately about red and processed meat increasing the risk of cancer and death?

The Introduction

Recent research is suggesting that high intakes of red or processed meat may increase death risk. A 2009 study  by the National Cancer Institute in America determined relationships between red and processed meat intakes and risk of total and cause-specific (e.g. cancer, heart disease) mortality.

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Does playing sport during younger adulthood protect us against cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and muscle mass loss into older age?

The Introduction

Most people become less active as they age. This more sedentary lifestyle is associated with increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), osteoporosis, and loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia). But what if we have been athletes in our younger age? Will that protect me from these lifestyle diseases?

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